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14/09/2017

Opelika woman looks to donate wedding dresses

For brides, their ideal wedding dress has been in their minds since they were young. They want the dress that gives them the fairy tale wedding of their dreams.

For Amber White, her dress was all that she wanted. It gave her the fairy tale wedding that she dreamed of. However, that dress has been sitting in her closet for the past seven years. Last week, before Hurricane Irma hit, she saw woke up and saw the dress in her closet and told her husband that she wanted to donate it to victims of Hurricane Harvey.

After Irma hit, she posted to Facebook about donating her wedding dress to the victims of Hurricane Harvey and Irma. Since then, blog sites have shared her post and hundreds of women have come forward wanting to help.

“It was one of the most important days of my life,” White said. “It’s the day where you commit to your significant other. As a little girl, it’s the day you look forward to your entire life. You picture that fairy tale wedding, and that’s what it was for me. When I laid eyes on this dress, I knew it was the dress. I wanted to feel like a princess. I could not imagine having the perfect dress, just to come back and see it ruined. Some women plan for years and years about the perfect day. They have their dress picked out months and years ahead just for one day and to have it completely stripped from them, I couldn’t even imagine.”

Alisia Adams saw White’s post Tuesday night, and wanted to help right away. She donated a bridesmaids dress to the cause.

“A lot of people have lost everything,” Adams said. “They literally have nothing to their name anymore. I guess the least I could do is give them a dress that they spent so much money on, and now it’s gone in a second.”

Jessica Branan donated a bridesmaids dress and two flower girl dresses and couldn’t help but think of the roles being reversed.

“It would mean everything for someone to do that,” Branan said. “You lose so much, and you spend so much on something and for it to be gone, that’s pretty hard.”

White said she has been amazed by all of the traction her post has gotten, but says it is nothing compared to what others have sacrificed after the hurricanes.

“I can’t physically go to Texas or Florida and help with the relief, but if me giving this up means a lot to people, then absolutely,” White said.

White said there is one catch to receiving one of the donated dresses. She asks that recipients pass their dress onto another bride who is in need.Read more at:SheinDressAU | bridesmaid dresses

09:55 Publié dans Mode, wedding | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0)

01/09/2017

Technology Is Eating Fashion

If you think you run a fashion business, you’re wrong. A technology business with a fashion focus? Sure. Anything else and you may as well wave the white flag, because the rules of the rag trade are changing. You’re either leading that change, or you’re a sitting duck ready to be picked off by a sharp-shooting tech juggernaut.

Since Amazon first started peddling books online, Jeff Bezos never once saw his company as a retailer. “Amazon is a technology company. We just happen to do retail,” said Amazon CTO Wagner Vogels in 2011. With this mentality it’s no surprise Amazon has been able to conquer retail category after retail category, solving long-old supply-chain inefficiencies using technology as the not-so-secret weapon.

From product development to distribution, nothing about the fashion supply-chain is agile. It’s impossible for traditional fashion businesses to respond to real-time demand; it takes too long to get ideas to market. Even Zara, the masters of supply-chain efficiency, can only bring a product to market in 10-15 days. In our hyper-connected digital world, a lot can change in 15 minutes let alone 15 days.

The supply-chain also fails with personalisation. Products must be designed to appeal to markets broad enough to justify producing at scale, sacrificing individualisation for unit economics. Then there’s the fit issue. Standard sizes statistically fit less than 20 percent of the total addressable population. Too many consumers fall between the cracks of standard sizing bell-curves.

These shortcomings are being aggressively addressed by tech companies. Amazon for one has been mining its retail data and spinning up private labels to exploit product gaps discovered in the apparel market. In April 2017 the company was granted a patent for an on-demand apparel manufacturing system that creates custom clothing to the fit and specifications of individual customers. This means Amazon can not only eliminate inventory, but can respond almost instantly to market trends, and sell their products to the entire population.

Los Angeles-based Fame and Partners is another pioneer in the on-demand apparel supply chain. Like Amazon, the online womenswear label has developed a proprietary factory floor system with their manufacturing partner near Shanghai. CEO Nyree Corby says Fame and Partners use a modular design approach, allowing them to create new styles tied to their pattern and factory floor systems, which in turn maximises design flexibility, fit, and manufacturability. Corby says the rise of direct to consumer labels “translates to a larger proportion of brands now taking inventory risk than their business models previously allowed for.” She adds that reduced barriers for new fashion labels going to market “is driving fragmentation of trends and contributing to the general retail malaise.”

As consumers and their expectations digitally evolve, so too must the companies that clothe them. It’s not viable for fashion companies to design products for market segments when tech companies can design products for specific individuals. It’s not viable for fashion companies to spend weeks or months bringing products to market if tech-companies can do the same in seconds.

Technologies like data mining, machine learning, pattern bootstrapping, and product virtualisation are the tools of the new game. Tools that are already bolstering the arsenal of tech retailers like San Francisco-based Stitch Fix. They use artificial intelligence to analyse and predict purchasing behaviour, and formulate new product designs based on what components of style are popular at the time. Their AI-design technology sorts through trillions of design and fabric variants to generate products that have a statistically-high chance of retail success.

Human designers cannot compete with AI-designers when it comes to synthesising complex data from multiple sources. They also can’t compete with AI-designers to action their findings and assemble, render, and launch entirely new products in seconds. A consumer may soon be browsing an eCommerce site as an AI-designer watches and learns from their actions. The machine could design, render, and display new products to the consumer in real-time based on what it believes they want. The product could then be manufactured only after the consumer has purchased the product, eliminating inventory risk.

This supply chain revolution doesn’t only apply to mass-market fashion brands. Luxury brands cannot claim superiority when tech-driven mass-market players can guarantee a more personalised and better-fitting product.

Technology also shifts the creative process towards a more symmetric interaction between consumers and brands. With AI, brands have the scalability to use individual customers as the basis of inspiration for designs. H&M’s Ivyrevel have collaborated with Google to translate “a week of your life into a one-of-a-kind design.” Lifestyle data is collected through an Ivyrevel app, including tracking venues they visit and activities they do. The app learns “who you are, what you like to do, and where you like to go,” and then proposes a unique dress design for a specific occasion.

This might sound like novelty, however it’s just the beginning of a movement where technology begins to inform the creative process. To remain at the cutting-edge, luxury brands must learn to harness AI to pioneer new and meaningful experiences with consumers.

Fashion businesses need to start their transition into technology companies now. The sooner they start, the sooner they’ll cultivate the domain expertise required to remain competitive in the future. Firstly, digitise historical designs and build a rich database of products split into their individual variants. When properly organised, a human or AI designer can easily reference this library to assemble unique product without having to create anything from scratch.

Secondly, ditch standard-size grading and adopt parametric pattern grading. With parametric grading any product design can be made to fit any body type. It is getting easier and easier to capture customer body data, from taking 3D body scans on smartphones to predicting 50+ measurements from a few questions about fit. It’s only a matter of time before the mass market falls for bespoke fit, and you don’t want to be dependent on standard sizes when that time comes.

With parametric grading and bespoke fit comes the third recommendation: supplement your mass-produced inventory with on-demand production. You can quash sizing-related problems, eliminate unsold inventory headaches, and be responsive to consumer demand on a sale-by-sale basis. A low-barrier-of-entry approach would be to leverage pre-sales as a way to collect a critical mass of orders before producing custom products at scale.

Finally, start collecting and analysing all the data that you have, such as point-of-sale data, e-commerce analytics and metrics about your customers. Whatever you have, collect it. Your biggest competitive advantage is locked away in the data that flows through your business, day in day out. Build infrastructure around your data to analyse and take action on the findings. Your business’ survival depends on it.

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16/08/2017

How to Make a Statement With These Minimalist Jewelry Pieces

Adding jewelry pieces to an outfit is a great way to take your look to another level as it can dress up any ensemble. Chunky rings and necklaces are great but dainty jewelry gives you more variety. With these types of accessories you can layer different designs like mixing metals and stacking different sized rings. You can also layer necklaces of different lengths and wear a bunch of chain bracelets. We’ve listed some stores that offer dainty jewelry pieces so you can start shopping this week.

Cinta

Cinta is a local brand that uses raw metals that are sustainably sourced. They offer rings, bracelets, anklets, necklaces and earrings. What is most interesting about their jewelry is the design. They create unique shapes that you might not have seen before.

Heart & Bolt

Jewelry from Heart & Bolt mixes different materials for each piece. They have chain and cord bracelets with charms or bangles with different stones. You can pick from their many designs or have a piece made especially for you.

Stockton Row

Despite their jewelry pieces being dainty, they stand out. Silver and gold metals are mixed with bright stones in blue, pink, and red. They even have zodiac-inspired pieces if you are into your astrology sign.

Mejuri

Mejuri works with jewelers in both Toronto and Seoul to deliver luxurious pieces that use ethically sourced materials like diamonds and chains. Their line ranges from chain bracelets to birthstone necklaces and even thread through earrings.

Micki Olaguer

Micki Olaguer makes her jewelry designs pop with her use of geometric shapes and colorful stones. Her dangling earrings are the perfect accessory that will frame your face and complete any outfit.

Namì

Namì, which means nice in Ilonggo, is a brand that creates timeless jewelry that you can wear everyday with any outfit. The pieces are crafted from sterling silver and are handmade in the Philippines. Their collections feature chokers, toe rings, and bangles to name a few.

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