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07/09/2017

Is High Quality Hair Really That Important For Clip-In Extensions

It’s quite the conundrum when it comes to choosing the right hair for your clip-in hair extensions. Temporary hair pieces are fantastic solutions for added length or volume. They are a popular choice for use on special occasions, weddings and the like. But if you only use them occasionally, as is normally the case for clip-in hair extensions, is it worth buying high quality hair if you won’t be wearing them every day?

It depends on who you ask of course. There are many hair extension pieces to choose from that are low in cost and quality. They are usually made from synthetic fibres or a low grade human hair that is designed for only a few uses. The trouble is, no matter how infrequent the use; those low-quality hair extensions may never give a realistic appearance.

If Only For A Day

Imagine if we applied that same thinking to a bride’s dress on her wedding day. She’s only going to wear it once. It may only be a few hours. Why should she spend so much money on something that typically spends the rest of its life at the back of a wardrobe? The wedding dress is important because she wants it to look special. An ill-fitted pattern and low-cost materials just aren’t going to cut it. Hair is your crown and glory. One you can never take off. It only makes sense to apply the same logic when thinking about your clip-in hair extensions.

Most mass-produced hair extensions use hair from multiple sources. This makes the hair very dense, meaning the hair doesn’t flow as naturally as your own hair would. Hair produced from a singular source or donor is much lighter and a truer representation of hair movement. We’ve all been to a wedding recently and spotted an obvious hair piece. It never quite looks right to the eye.

A Better Way

The best thing you can do to ensure your clip-in extensions look the part is a little due diligence. If you are going to invest into some real hair extensions, you don’t want to buy unsuitable hair. First you need to understand what structure of hair you need. If you own hair is naturally wavy or curly, straight extensions won’t match your texture; even if you curl them. Then you need to find the correct colour. Not always easy if buying online. Always read the terms and conditions about returns if the colour isn’t suitable. Where possible, always have a consultation first.

You also need to ensure you have the right amount of volume. Most hair bundles come in multiples of 100g. If you have very thick hair you will need to consider 150g or more. Another good tip is to check if the attachments or amount of them are suitable for your hair. Not all clip-in attachments are the same and you need to make sure they’re not visible or are liable to slide out.

Ultimately, if you are in unfamiliar territory with clip-in hair extensions then you should consult a well-informed hair extension stylist who would be able to explain the nuances of the extension industry. It is the difference between a box dye job and a qualified stylist. One gives you an amazing result; the other is questionable.Read more at:bridesmaid dresses sydney | bridesmaid dresses brisbane

09:05 Publié dans beaute, wedding | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0)

25/08/2017

How these £6,855 boots could be yours for £34.99

Once upon a time (well, in February), a pair of knee-high boots, salted with 3,000 tiny individual rhinestones, walked down the Saint Laurent catwalk in Paris. The industry instantly swooned, as if under the spell of head designer Anthony Vaccarello. But a month later they were spotted on the feet of pop’s most fearless and fashion-savvy princess, Rihanna. Then came a shoot of Cara Delevingne in this September’s Elle, the feet of 2017’s beacon of fashion-forward hope Celine Dion, and, just like that, their status as the boot of the moment was cemented.

And, because we can’t all wear the Saint Laurent boots “phresh out” the catwalk like Riri, the high street has produced an array of homages. From black sequinned mid-calf boots at Next, to knee-high, non-slouchy, very shiny versions at Topshop and a relatively understated offering from Russell and Bromley, they have virtually become a meme. The most wearable pair is the Topshop chunky-heeled version.

It’s a tale as old as time – every season has its cult item(s). Last autumn it was the Balenciaga padded jacket, worn shrobed, as was the season’s way, on the catwalk in Paris. Variations on the theme soon found their way from the catwalk and on to high streets up and down the country, with Urban Outfitters’ green iteration proving so popular and ubiquitous that it got its own Instagram: “thatpuffa”, papped the jacket in chicken shops, on dates and at the library.

But the boots have an edge over the padded jacket – shiny, bright as diamonds, they are solid Insta-bait, no filter necessary. At one with the season’s broader trend for all that glitters – chainmail and sequins have been widely deployed at Gucci, Emilia Wickstead and Versace – they look like something Liberace might have worn. Or disco balls hammered out and moulded into boot form. It’s no wonder they have – despite their £6,855 ($10,000) price tag – sold out on Net-a-Porter and reportedly racked up gargantuan wait-lists at Saks Fifth Avenue and Bergdorf Goodman. Or that they are on the pages of many of the September issues.

If you are feeling brave, style them like Rihanna, who owned the inevitable wrinkle of jeans stuffed into boots by making that an intentional styling device and teamed them with an oversized T-shirt, leather biker jacket and discus-sized gold hoop earrings. If you are feeling less brave, go the Celine way with an otherwise all-black outfit. Either way, be ready for plenty of attention.

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08:25 Publié dans wedding | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0)

23/08/2017

A Running List of Fashion Bankruptcies

On the heels of an array of retail bankruptcy filings in 2016, New York-based designer Bibhu Mohapatra and retailers The Limited, Wet Seal, and most recently, Payless, have all filed for Chapter 11 protection this year, signaling that there is no end in sight to the constant string of fashion companies struggling financially.

Some of the most recent retail bankruptcies have been those of the traditional mall retailers, whose businesses have suffered significantly in light of fast fashion's growth. Moreover, market giants, such as Wal-Mart and Target have wiped out a number of other companies, who were unable to compete with their pricing power and general reach. And as noted by many sources, any existing retail problems only increased when Amazon arrived on the scene.

For the uninitiated, Chapter 11 bankruptcy – one of the most commonly utilized forms of bankruptcy – allows a company to continue operating while it executes a reorganization plan. Chapter 11 can take a number of forms, but in short: A chapter 11 case begins with the filing of a petition with the bankruptcy court by the debtor (the entity that owes the debt – aka the retailers in the cases at hand). This is followed by the debtor proposing and executing a reorganization plan, which may be used to compromise or even eliminate certain classes of debt.

All the while, the debtor usually remains in possession of his assets and continues to operate any business, subject to the oversight of the court and the creditors committee. Typically, a company that has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy trying to stay in business, and as indicated below, this complex proceeding can be very effective in solving short term business problems in an otherwise viable company or winding down a company with valuable assets.

Retail Bankruptcies

Here is a look at some of the most recent retail-related filings, as well as some significant ones dating back a bit further.

July 2017 - Alfred Angelo

The major bridal dress chain abruptly closed an array of its stores in July leaving brides and bridesmaids dress-less, panicked, and in limbo. Alfred Angelo – a Florida-based company that stocks at nearly 1,400 boutiques across the U.S. and internationally, including self-owned and operates stores in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Miami, and D.C. – has since confirmed the store closures and that it has filed for bankruptcy protection.

July 2017 - True Religion

U.S. denim retailer True Religion Apparel confirmed that it has filed for bankruptcy protection and signed a restructuring agreement with a majority of its lenders. True Religion, a company whose denims have gradually fallen out of style, filed for creditor protection under Chapter 11 in the U.S. bankruptcy court in the District of Delaware, and listed assets and liabilities in the range of $100 million to $500 million.

June 2017 - Papaya Clothing

Teen apparel seller Papaya Clothing has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The privately held California-based company, which maintains a network of 80 brick-and-mortar stores and about 1,300 employees, said in its filing that its financial difficulties came from competition from e-commerce and a poorly timed expansion, according to the Wall Street Journal. Opening its first store in 1999, Papaya added about 50 new stores in the last six years. The expansion took “a heavy financial toll” and significantly increased operating expenses, court papers stated.

May 2017 – Rue21

U.S. teen fashion retailer Rue21 Inc filed for Chapter 11 protection on Monday in the Western District of Pennsylvania bankruptcy court.The retail chain, which sells budget-priced clothing and accessories at over 1,100 stores across the United States, listed assets and liabilities in the range of $1 billion and $10 billion, according to the court filing.

April 2017 – Jaeger

British brand Jaeger has gone into administration, following confirmation from the brand it filed a notice of intention to appoint administrators. According to the BBC, Jaeger, which was founded in 1884 and has counted actresses and Kate Middleton among its fans, has struggled to keep up with rivals, such as Burberry, or see off competition from fast-fashion chains including Zara and H&M.

April 2017 – Payless, Inc

Payless filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in St. Louis, listing liabilities of $1 billion to $10 billion and citing a plan to immediately close about 400 underperforming stores in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. “This is a difficult, but necessary, decision driven by the continued challenges of the retail environment, which will only intensify,” Chief Executive Officer W. Paul Jones said in a statement.

March 2017 – BCBG Max Azria

BCBG, a venerated contemporary brand, which has been a major force in the Los Angeles fashion industry for nearly 30 years, filed for bankruptcy in a third attempt in two years to rescue the business hit hard by changing consumer habits. According to its bankruptcy filing, BCBG is rejecting a number of store leases and closing 120 unprofitable stores that racked up $10 million in losses during fiscal 2016. These stores made up 63 percent of BCBG’s total losses from retail locations with negative contribution margins, the company said in U.S. Bankruptcy Court filings in New York.

Some lenders have agreed to loan the company $45 million to help it get through bankruptcy. That loan must be approved by the judge in the case. BCBG owes lenders about $459 million.

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09:55 Publié dans wedding | Lien permanent | Commentaires (0)